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Lodge of Sorceresses is Growing towards PvE Endgame!!!

We are recruiting active players, enthusiastic about PvE content in ESO, to grow towards the Endgame (progressive veteran Trials, currently running 2 Cores, 2 more being planned) through what we call "Midgame" content (veteran DLC Dungeons & vArenas). To achieve our goal, we organize events everyday: 12-man content at 8:30pm CET (German time). We do Midgame content in a daily basis.

Who can join?

  • We accept CP 300+ players, for long-term camaraderie. Candidates need to be able to attend our events at least 3 times a week (Mid-/End-game). Raids start at 8:15pm CET (events last 2-2.5 hrs max)...
  • We only are looking forward to players who can play the game 4-5 evenings a week in general, with future Endgame prospect in mind... No logging in from raid to raid. We believe "you learn the game by playing it!".

What We Provide?

  • Constant training and growth to help you become a killing machine (or a healing lifespring) as we progress together...
  • Fun environment to do PvE - absolutely zero elitism, patience and tolerance towards new/unskilled players and such...
  • Discord - where we socialize, which is our primary guild chat...
  • Premium Website - where we organize our events, socialize further. Featuring event reviews written by our members. Colorful Event gallery... 
  • Custom Planner - where we plan to organize even better (coming very soon!)
  • Guild Housing - where you can find Crafting Stations, Transmutation Station, Mundus Stones and ever growing cool decoration for your seeing pleasure...
  • Youtube Channel - where we stream almost all events we do as a guild...

Who Shouldn't Join?

  • Whoever isn't sure about their availability and playtime. We really don't want to chase after people and remind them to sign up for events. So if unsure, please don't waste our time!!!

If you like what you read, please kindly signup on our website (make sure you complete your profile here 100%).

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Guest neaNicu

sorry, noob here! :)

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Guest neaNicu
Hello all,

 

I noticed that we are so "shy" for the moment, we login, check for new forum content and then logout so I decided to break the ice with some noob-level questions.

As I said in my introductory posting, I am a Skyrim player and have no experience at all in MMOs, except for 3 sessions of ESO beta testing.

I tried to read (on this forum but also other sources) but so many questions remained unanswered.

I wanted to ask for your help. Is there any source (link) which explains (as briefly as possible) some basic information about MMOs?

I assume at least 50% of ESO's players will come from Skyrim so most probably after release there will be a lot of players new to the concept of MMOs so I will not be the only one with these questions.

 

Let me explain myself.

As I saw in beta, 98% of ESO PVE could be played as single player. There are some difficult public dungeons but nothing impossible.

However, it will be more fun to play in party with few friends, so let's say it is like a RPG with co-op option.

This friends could be real-life friends and / or guild colleagues.

This part is clear for me.

 

I'm normally interested only in PVE, exploration, questing and achievements. I will probably try crafting or pvp out of pure curiosity but they are not important to me.

My plan was / is to play (in a party with friends) all quests/exploration/achievements in a specific zone, then move to next zone etc. up to level 50, then move to other alliances zones and so on. This would take several months I presume.

In this time, Zenimax would release expansions, unlock new zones etc.

Playing arround 3-4 hours/day, hopefully all this content + expansions could keep me in game for at least 6 months, maybe more. I can not accurately estimate this.

Is there more to the game?

 

Then, I read on this forum about "raids" and "end-game"?

Then, "guild bank / store", with different access level, deposits, withdraws, vaults etc?

The guild organisation looks quite complex.

Is this for pvp purposes only or is there more to the game than questing/exploring?

To be honest with you, I joined this guild mostly for socializing purposes.

I (probably) need more information to be able to understand why the concept of guilds (and their complex internal organisation) is important for MMOs.

What is the difference between playing co-op style in a small informal group of 4-5 friends and a huge guild of 500 members?

Could you please provide a link to basic MMO concepts?

Thanks a lot for your time / help and sorry for noob questions, I am just trying to understand how things work.

Hace a nice day!

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Well, then brace, because you asked dangerously complex question :) Here goes your answers, at least the way I have experienced MMOs in past 3+ years (there are veterans who have played MMOs longer than me, so I am sure they will have their own few cents to add to this "pool"):

 

The Beginning

 

MMO experience for any novice begins as if they are playing regular RPG: because you start your first quest and begin leveling. You are in starter zone and most probably you have no idea what expects you. You get shocked when you discover about "Capital city" of your faction, and as you finish discovering every corner in it, you start loving your game more. This generally happens between levels 5-10. In this period, you are doing almost everything solo, no concept of grouping or team work so far. Depending on MMO you are playing, you wake from this "dream"-state once you encounter your first elite mob/boss and get your butt kicked...

 

First Group Work

 

Then, again depending on MMO you are playing, you reach level 12 and you discover the concept of dungeons. Dungeons are 4-5 person job, can't be soloed unless your tier is way above its level requirements - at least in ESO's case, you can't enter dungeons too far below your tier, which makes it technically impossible to solo any dungeons ever in this game (as far as I have seen in betas of course). At this point, you realize why group-activity is important in MMOs: you just need help of others, plain and simple.

 

In some MMOs, as you level, you also get acquainted with certain quests which cannot be done alone: those quests also make you leave solo life. This stage generally continues until max level, until you are done with leveling. In this period, you learn about instanced PvPs (where certain amount of people fight each other in Arena style), dungeons, epic quests which all are done in groups, and you do a lot of initial crafting business to master your art.

 

Remember, the game you are playing hasn't yet started. Because every MMO starts once you reach level 50 with almost all quests done. Until then, believe it or not, as a muscle you are insignificant to anyone: you are like a student, a potential to become a giant one day and claim your place among guild ranks.

 

Post Max-Level

 

Game starts at this point. If you have managed to finish (at least, almost) all quests by the time you reach maximum level, then you really have experienced the RPG side of the game. The story side, the single-player classic gaming side of it - which is quite joyful experience. But as enjoyable as it's been, its old school - MMOs exist to extend the frontiers of gaming, and you are just stepping into that extended world, the world of Massive Multiplayer Online gaming. Welcome! :)

 

As you step-in this MMO world, you start hearing about concepts such as "raids", "ranked PvP sessions" etc. You start hearing about how serious these stuff are, and how well prepared you should be for them. This is when you realize how novice (I won't use word "noob" :) ) you have been during the leveling period. You will discover that you have actually played the game completely wrongly, including your skills. First order of business will be to learn your class, from scratch, from experts, and RESPEC your character. :D

 

Then immediately you will feel the shocking terror of word grinding. :) You will be told that to be raid-ready, you need to do certain stuff everyday, to gain certain gear, skills etc to come closer for raid-readiness. As a novice, of course that will be something new for you, and you will eagerly start "grinding".

 

If things go well, if you really enjoy it and get to minimum requirements, both in skill and gear, you will be accepted to your guild's events such as, let's say "raids". Raids are not your regular dungeons where simple boss mechanics suffice and once you kill those bosses you end up being a hero, saving the day and get satisfied with your "glories". The first day you raid, you will die so many times, that if a little bit too pessimistic in nature, you will feel like you are playing the game for the first time. Remember Overlord Draugr's in Labyrinthian, in Skyrim? Well, if by accident you reached that dungeon in low level (like level 15) as I did, you know what I mean - each arrow you eat from that Draugr totally makes your concept of fights change.

 

Also during your first raid, especially if its a PUG (short for "pick-up-group", meaning raid group created from random people in the game), or an intolerant guild, you will be humiliated almost for every negative thing coming from you: everytime you die, for your lack of skill and gear. And you also will see how (rightfully) annoyed people get, when some raider outright disrespects them, by, let's say going to toilet every 10 minutes, or eating during raid, or just by going AFK (away from keyboard), or just messing up and failing consciously etc.

 

As you gear-up gradually, beat your raid bosses and get veteran yourself, you will start expecting serious raids, serious people who know how to do the job, as being funny or social won't cut it all the time. As in real life, everything has place and time, and there is place and time for socializing in MMOs, and place and time for serious stuff, like raiding.

 

Why Guild Bank Rules? Why so serious about stuff in Bank?

 

Imagine you bring in new guy to the guild, he jokes with you, creates some relations, and one day (it might happen even as late as a month, or a year after you been together) BAM, he cleans out Guild Bank and leaves. As a member you might be frustrated, maybe for your own contributions there that got stolen, or team's. But imagine guild masters' emotions there! Our guilds, as any of our work, are like our babies to us! Whoever meddles with our guilds, outright become our #1 enemies in MMOs. Thus, to protect our work - which is our guild, which is made of people we call "guildies" - we must have certain rules in place. Guild Bank rules exist to serve that purpose. Among and similar to other rules that exist there as well.

 

Why Disciplined/Strict Raid Regulations? Possibly, seemingly high requirements?

 

In any MMO, you raid with 20+ people. That means its a social event, which becomes evident especially when you are told to login to VoIP server (like Teamspeak) and hear their voices. That, as in real life, requires certain responsibility: because in any mature guild, people playing are in their late 20s or above. Which means, those people generally are working class, with real-life going on. Which means they have limited time to play and they want to get the most out of that limited time.

 

Don't they want to socialize? Of course most of them definitely do. But MMOs are games, and games primarily are about gaming. In MMOs, we add social component on top of that and make things fun. But that doesn't mean raid should wipe for countless hours, or days, even weeks on one boss, just because one or two raider failed to help themselves and come prepared. (Un?)Fortunately it doesn't work that way! And it's not realistic anyway (How many failed dungeons have you been to, during betas?).

 

To that end, to increase the quality of raids and offer our raiders something substantial, which we call a progress, we have to have some rules in place. To a veteran MMO player, those rules are something they pray for in every MMO they participate. But to a new guy, as expected, they might seem like an overkill. With experience you will learn the necessity of those seemingly "high" standards and thank your guild for having and enforcing them, hopefully, without any elitist/intolerant incidents (which I believe are also covered in our Raid Core Guidelines).

 

Do I have to be part of every event in guild?

 

Definitely not. In Lodge, we don't force people to play in a way they don't desire to. You are free to do whatever you want to. Socialize as much as you want, sit behind keyboard and chat all day long not doing a single quest - not important really. But the moment you decide to be part of bigger plans, you will have new responsibilities towards your guildies. PvE, PvP or even RP you join will have their own set of rules, regulations, requirements and what not. That is a fact! We can't please everyone, all of us know this fact - but we can try our best to protect everyone's common interests.

 

Does that make Lodge a hardcore guild?

 

Not at all. We are casual guild in every respect. Our raiding is semi-hardcore, and definitely not hardcore. In hardcore guilds, you raid every single day for minimum 5-6 hours and even accidental, yet noobish mistakes made are met with utmost rage. We raid 3 days a week, and only afterwork, for 3 hours tops. All we do differently, is to increase the performance of those 3x3 hours and get things done.

 

 

ANY MORE QUESTIONS? :)

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Few more answers in regard to your early questions:

 

What is the difference between playing co-op style in a small informal group of 4-5 friends and a huge guild of 500 members?

 

Firstly, we don't plan to have that many members - except maybe for popularity of our Guild Store (which should be popular as it will be our in-game Market). Having too big a guild is a nightmare to maintain and since raids require 24 people only, you can't have too many raiders unless you plan to have parallel runs - which add more work to guild management and is an undesirable situation for any guild leader. As it is subscription based game, ESO will have rather higher quality and more dedicated community of players and in time you will find additional friends outside your guild(s) with whom you will do certain small-scale social events, like dungeons. But PUGs are notorious for their failures in raids, unless all PUG players are highly geared people who know tactics of raids very well due to their earlier experiences, with gear enabling them withstand damage, perform better. So long story short, guilds are a must-have, if you plan to experience endgame content in fastest and most delicious way possible, hopefully with zero frustrations.

 

Is there more to the game?

 

I hope there is, especially in PvE side of things. PvP is still mystery to me, but owning a keep has its advantages to your guild, so guess we will have to be active in that arena as well. Additionally, more than half of Tamriel is locked for launch, which will be enabled gradually as Zenimax introduces new content to the game. Considering that we will hit max level in currently available zones, the new zones will be top level, epic questing areas. Or maybe they will increase level cap for a few extra levels (50 to 55 maybe, or similar). We will see. But average MMO lifetime for any MMO player is around 2+ years, minimum. It can become as long as 12 years :) as we have seen in World of Warcraft.

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Guest neaNicu

Uff, that was quite shocking! I didn't see it coming!

So basically you are trying to tell me that the game BEGINS when I thought it would END? :)

 

I thought it is like in Skyrim, level enough to reach armor cap and magic resistance cap, become invincible, do all quests, explore everything, save the world and then go with Serana in a nice mountain area, isolated, mansion to live a peaceful, well-deserved retirement :P

 

OK, joke aside, it works for me, it would keep me occupied more months than I estimated, which is a good thing.

 

By the way, I was just kindly asking for a link, I didn't mean you to lose time to write so much for me.

Thanks a lot!

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Thing is, there can't be a link for this :) MMO is lived, not read about!

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Guest neaNicu

I totally understand you in regards in "too big of a guild is a nightmare to maintain".

I played a MMO recently (but FPS not RPG) and we had to manage a Top 5-10 world clan (guild) with 100 members.

Very time consuming. Especially human relations between members, a lot of fighting, small groups with different views and interests etc.

This is part of the reason for which I preferred NOT to create a guild in ESO but to join one already created and just focus on my gameplay.

I love Elder Scrolls too much to lose my time with issues such as player X cursed player Y and Z does not like X and what kind of disciplinary procedure should we use or maybe we can reconcile them and so son.

Hopefully for you, maybe since ESO is NOT free-to-play, players quality (and age) will be different.

Also, I think it is an advantage in being an international guild instead of a national one.

Thanks again for your time and help and best of luck!

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Oh dear Meri O_O but well explained.

 

And thank you Serana for breaking the ice and get us talking :) The very best thing about a guild is to meet people and make friends, that is actually for me a lot of what MMO's is about.

 

It is the funniest thing to find out when you play MMOs that everything begins when you thought it was ending, when you reach the max level. I was told it was like that and I didn't believe it before I experienced it :P

 

But it is also I think more fun to do things together, or just to have someone to talk to about the game (if your afk friends don't play, and mine don't). You can play most MMOs for very long as a solo game if you want and sometimes that is nice also, but the real fun is in co-operation!

 

The best part of MMOs are dungeons/raids. I play them only with guildmates because you need to really work together, know your role, part and place among the others in your group and know tactics for the bosses. If one fails all might die! So when you work together maybe 10-15-20 people and everything works as a clockwork and you get the hard boss down it is the best feeling this kind of game can give you ;) This is also why you want people in your guild to be mature players, who understand how to distribute loot among them so not the player gets better, but the group benifits most. You have to think as a group and forget a bit about the individuality. I think ESO will be nice for this, because the armour and weapon doesn't seem to be too braggy, as in WoW where you get ninjas, who think of themselves and not the group/guild. But you have found a good guild in this aspect, because atleast in Rift the system worked fair and well.

 

Now let us hope they implement housing very soon, so we can also have the laidback times where we go for tea at guildmates places and tell stories about dungeon fights :)

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In ESO loot is instanced, so there won't be any Loot rules for raids :) which is a very nice idea IMO.

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Ah yea I did hear/read something about that. That is nice, no arguing over that then :)

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Guest neaNicu

it happened to me in beta to arrive late to a boss fight, barely touched him but received loot so I presume all people which did at least 1 HP damage would receive something :)

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you also get loot (and xp) by just healing someone who kills something. I rolled a healer and jsut started spamming heals while questing, thus earning me tons of XP while I wasn't even in a group. 

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Is the healer the platewearing mage? Or can all become healers? (clearly I still haven't figure the skillcalculator out O.o)

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Guest NeedfulLad

When I created a healer I picked Templar for the healing skills but went with light armor and the healing staff and used only the healing tree of the class. Then again I didn't get as far as the first dungeon so I don't know how it would have worked out.

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Technically, TES games never cared about gear-vs-class concept. Whatever armor type you wear, make sure you wear it all the time and level it to the hell :D It won't affect any of your abilities.

 

Thing is, with melee class, you can't effectively use light or medium armor. Its not because those armors are bad - if max-leveled those armors, you'd always have had much more armor than heavy armor - its because, at early levels, caster mages have WARD spells and some alteration spells which act like armor enhancers. Melee player who never uses those spells, can't survive at early levels with light armor and sword :) Plus, mages in classic TES games (Skyrim withstanding) can easily use Cloth as well, which could have NO armor whatsoever - again, for the same reasons: alteration spells such as wards could shield you easy enough. 

 

And same goes for TESO as well: you can be heavy plated mage quite easily. But since effective casting abilities are limited to sorcerers only, as a melee in TESO you won't have alteration spells and can't really survive with light and medium armor, at least in early stages.

 

Let's also not forget that TESO and TES classic games have dramatic design differences. :) One gotta plan this kinda stuff carefully.

Edited by Merigold

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Guest NeedfulLad

While you could pick heavy armor for your mage and be effective ,if I remember correctly light armor has bonuses in magicka which is really useful for casters.

Edited by NeedfulLad

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While you could pick heavy armor for your mage and be effective ,if I remember correctly light armor has bonuses in magicka which is really useful for casters.

 

In TESO or classic TES games? Never heard of such thing in classic games. If TESO, where did you read this?

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Guest NeedfulLad

I meant in TESO and I remembered it from experience. I just checked on the skill calculator and the light armor skill tree offers magicka regeneration and reduction cost for every piece of light armor you have equipped.

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Yea, guess that is new to TESO :( Bad. They actually are limiting our abilities drastically, yet advertising it otherwise.

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If you want to be a serious mage/healer in ESO, you have to stick to light armor. Not doing so will result in less mana and more manacost for spells, like NeedfulLad said, which will not work for you in the long run, because they cannot be countered by other abilities. So if you are the main healer and you run out of mana and you're wearing no light armor, you are effectively making the wrong choice when it comes to equipping the right gear for the job. It is a shame, but ESO does not give you the freedom, realistically speaking, of choosing your own armortype. The same argument applies to heavy armor and tanking. 

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Guest NeedfulLad

There are certain points on your stats that if you hit it reduces the amount it will increase when you equip more items that increase it. For example if the armor stat reaches that point if you equip more armor it won't increase by the amount the armor says it will increase. That point is getting bigger as you level up I think.

 

So you could focus on magicka with other means like enchantments and still reach that point with heavy armor, like enchanting all the pieces of heavy armor to increase magicka regeneration or cost reduction(if that is a stat). Then again I was never level 50 to know for sure.

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You mean CAP, as in armor cap or stat cap. Yea that exists to avoid OP'ing (over-powering), which is good IMO.

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Guest NeedfulLad

I don't know if it is a cap because when I say cap I think of something that can't get increased, which I don't know if it's the case with what really happens. From what I understood it just gets harder to increase not impossible and I think it's a good idea too.

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